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Why are any of us here, really? Why do we try? Why are you trying?

It's meaningless. We're just a bunch of pixels.

Feelings here aren't real. All the cute girls are 50-year-old fat, balding guys. All the guys are 50 years old, fat, and balding as well. Everyone is a pedophile. Did I mention we were all fat? Neckbeards.

That guy who you like talking to is either laughing at you with his friends, or masturbating to your Facebook profile - which, by the way, is made up entirely of photomanipulations to disguise the reality of your 50yearoldfatbaldneckbeardery.

It's just the Internet, of course you won't change anything. It isn't a real form of communication, like a phone or a hand-written letter.

The Internet is entirely a farce, a lie, a cheat, and utterly inane.


I've been on the Internet for - I don't know, about a decade now. For me, it's always been sort of like what I imagine the unexplored Western frontier was like for Americans long, long ago, minus the chance of being bitten by snakes or eaten by my starving peers while we sit, stranded, on a freezing mountain top.

It's the perfect Wild West for the 21st century – a wide, open space where one can act without much fear of government, all consequences safely away from the physical realm.

Well, mostly. It isn't completely disconnected from the physical realm. The Internet is still the "real world". What you do on the Internet is still part of your "real life". Were the Internet not real - were you unaffected by it - you would simply not be here. Were it "just the Internet", none of us would be here.

But who cares, this is just the Internet, right? What I'm writing - what you're reading, processing, hiding away bits and pieces of away in your mind for further consumption at a later time - is only important to me on the Internet. Once I leave the Internet, I completely forget about what I've written, who has read it, what people thought, and who I have spoken to. I forget whose words I've laughed at and I forget about the pictures I've seen. It's just the Internet. None of it is real or worthy of remembrance, right? Right? Come on, now. Don't take this seriously. It's just the Internet.

Every time one of us says that, we are discrediting those we are speaking to, the versatile form of communication many of us have come to rely on, and ourselves. When you’re speaking to a someone you’ve come to enjoy and they lash out at you, do you not feel pain? Maybe you can’t see their face – but you’re still left to wonder what you’ve done. Maybe you can’t hear their voice, but can’t you tell they are upset? While the Internet’s notorious lack of inflection can sometimes leave emotions and motives in question, we are all aware that raw, unprotected, evident emotion - unhindered by the social mores of the offline world - is more often than not the reality.

When you say “it’s just the Internet”, all you’re doing is rubbing denial into your wounds. It’s the virtual equivalent of crossing your arms, tossing your head, and saying “well, I don’t care!”, only to have the sinking feeling left in your stomach as a reminder that you are, in fact, human, and you do, in fact, care. That’s why so many people who say “it’s just the Internet” still keep Livejournals. They’re still people, you know – just people in denial.

It’s also surprising how little credit we, as a culture, will openly give the Internet. Phrases like “thank you, Internet” are always used in sarcasm or to ironically accent something terrible the speaker has found; information from the Internet – even from credible sources – is often viewed as lesser than that found in books; people who enjoy recreational activities on the Internet are “clearly deficient” – even to the other people who do it; and words said over the Internet between people who know each other well are regarded as being less trustworthy than what they may say face-to-face, as if to imply that lies only occur on the Internet.

We seem to loathe crediting the Internet with anything more emotionally significant than providing us a place to get free music, even though software to facilitate online communication is extremely popular and viewed as “necessary” to many Internet users. Don’t have AIM, MSN, Yahoo!, or an equivalent? You’re in the extreme minority. Furthermore, even less credit is lent to this attitude because of the fact that many people who flaunt it are “dedicated” forum posters who spend much of their free time – if not all of it – posting on that particular forum.

What does this mean? It’s difficult to discern what it means for everyone, but I feel the likely source of the problem is the fact that we are the first generation to experience such widespread use, influence, and importance of the Internet, and are not culturally endowed with the traits to handle the often strange and intense emotional and social situations being a regular Internet user can put a person in."IT'S JUST THE INTERNET" can be likened to being a frightened child in school and reacting to the new influences, unfamiliar environment, and aggressive or simply uncaring peers by shouting “I DON’T CARE!” as loud and as often as possible in order to assure peers that he is quite fine in the situation and is in fact above it, thank you, peons. The smarter peers don’t believe it, and I believe this remains true in the virtual realm.

However, just like those frightened children, with time a behavior that was originally a defense mechanism can become ingrained and even expressed casually. While it is still a negative and telling behavior, it may no longer indicate an overwhelming fear of the surroundings – which is why many seemingly confident, old-guard Internet users are very fond of bandying the phrase “It’s just the Internet” around, even though in this stage of their lives its use is no longer to protect the self, but to undermine the position of a user who is more secure in the Internet’s social environment (or just more honest) and to protect themselves from the ego threat that user creates. Translation: People who are honest about their feelings regarding things that occur on the Internet are frequently the target of insecure ridicule.

Regardless of how much I wish people would stop throwing the phrase around like it’s about to go out of style (it’s so see-through!), it would be unfair not to talk about the unintentional positive aspect of the “it’s just the Internet” phenomenon. Our flippant attitude towards Internet communication allows us to maintain the combination of frank honesty and openness that is seen on the Internet and often considered impossible, infeasible (or at least socially questionable) offline. If we took the Internet as seriously as we do face-to-face interaction,  the culture of the Internet would change drastically - possibly for, if not the worse, the less revolutionary.

If you truly take the feelings of everybody on the Internet as seriously as you might offline, you can't always tell them when you think they're being a douche, which might be your automatic reaction online. You can't openly discuss your homosexuality with many people offline, while online you can find communities where it's par for the course to discuss your sexual orientation. To do that offline, you've gotta find a support group. To do it online is so normal as to almost be considered asinine.

Furthermore, if we admitted to taking the Internet as seriously as we often do, where would our excuses go? What would way say when confronted with our own mistakes? When you say something online that someone takes to heart and gets upset or comes down hard on you, "It's just the Internet" is a convenient way to turn the attention away from yourself and onto the accuser - and to create the illusion of you as a person who is simply playing the Internet game - what would it matter, in such a case, whether you said something stupid or socially taboo? It's just the Internet, after all, and you're just having fun like everyone else. While the use of the phrase as an excuse is obnoxious, it is an integral part of the permissive way we communicate online.

The culture we've created for ourselves on the Internet - and yes, it is a culture - is a unique one, partially shaped by the negative attention focused on the Internet by its own denizens. A conscious attempt by Internet users to "take the Internet more seriously" would be likely to backfire and create an atmosphere more stilted than what we deal with concerning face-to-face communication.

I hope to live live long enough to see us adapt culturally to deal better with the social arena we've created online, losing the petulant insecurities without throwing away the freedom that defines this communication medium. Here's to hoping we all live that long.
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:iconclairvoire:
Clairvoire Featured By Owner Jun 30, 2011
(don't mind me, just going through old articles)

The internet /used/ to be the wild west. Filled with adventurers and the courageous, intelligent. Netiquette existed and few ever violated it. Then more and more the general public gained access, however flimsy their grasp of the internet or computers in general was. And they did what they did to the New World, and the West, and everything else they settled. They turned it into a giant disgusting shopping mall.

If you ever wondered the motivation of the programmers who spend so much time writing viruses and exploits, look no further.
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:iconpamellka:
pamellka Featured By Owner Dec 11, 2010  Student Filmographer
Ingenious! Very good point, laddie.
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:iconaskyofautumntears:
ASkyOfAutumnTears Featured By Owner Oct 23, 2010
In other words, we are kids in a classroom with the teacher only allowing verbal abuse between students, but it still affects the kid outside the classroom. Or instead, that kid could just not give a damn what those mean bullies say about him/her and just go on with life like that class never existed.
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:iconmasonthekiller:
masonthekiller Featured By Owner Oct 16, 2010
Life on the internet can be very harsh. Though it's through a medium that's considered 'virtual', it still is a medium of culture, society, information, and relationships which are reflections, if not refractions, of what we consider the 'real world'. People interact and experience love and hate, joy and sorrow, despondency and hope, clarity and turmoil, but in a greater state than they might, and that then reflects back into the 'real world'.

It's imbecilic to dismiss the internet, and any actions or circumstance taken therein, as something inferior to our world when it takes such precedence in our ever changing society.
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:iconjoobr-the-jobbernowl:
FDHSFJDShfjkshfsjks LOL the comments on this I'M SO SORRY CHHHRHRRIIISSTTt THEY'RE SO EMBARRASSING TO READ

I CAN'T EVEN

oh god i'm so glad i'm me and not someone making a total ass of themselves on deviantart.com
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:iconheysawbones:
heysawbones Featured By Owner Oct 15, 2010  Professional General Artist
I feel that way a lot, but I suspect I do it too I DON'T HAVE ENOUGH INSIGHT
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:iconsephirothsflamedwing:
SephirothsFlamedWing Featured By Owner Oct 14, 2010  Hobbyist General Artist
The main cause of internet insensitivity is simply the anonymity that the internet provides. I think most people are aware, of course, that there is another human being on the 'other side' of a comment. The problem is that there is no face-to-face communication going on. This involves the lack of gestures, intonation, ect. that people use to judge meaning by, but more importantly helps foster the illusion that there is no punishment or retaliation for one's action.

I think this holds true 'in the real world,' so to speak, when anonymity comes into play. One example that immediately comes into my mind is the Milgram experiment. Ignoring the fact of the 'authority' commanding them to go on, it proves to be similar. When the subjects couldn't see the person, it was easier to deliver painful shocks to them, even to the point of fatality. The Stanford Prison experiment also shows the same kind of thing, though it has less to do with anonymity. When you categorize people as being an X, (as in the internet, people are not just people but are deviants, or what have you) it's easier to feel alright to treat others as a sub-human X. What holds true on the internet, to some degree, also holds true elsewhere.

You're right about there being an internet culture, though I'm not convinced it all has to do with internet users denigrating the very tool they use or just not taking it seriously. Once again, I go back to the concept of internet anonymity. One of the sort-of perks of being an anonymous user is that you can be open and frank about yourself and what you really feel and believe. You become just one of billions of people expressing an opinion that many others share, and you simply fade into being a statistic. No sensible person rages at a statisic. Of course, this openness can have a downside too, as evidenced by this recent graduate's mock thesis about the sexual performance of the men she's been with. Anything put on the internet is out there for all to see. While most stuff gets lost in the morass of information available, if there has been any identifying information attached to it and someone cares to look, it's going to be unwanted baggage following you around for a while.

The main point I'm making here is that when people have lower inhibition (resulting from anonymity and no fear of retaliation/punishment) certain people will behave callously and immaturely. Obviously, it isn't so simple as saying that anonymity creates an insensitive environment. There are tons of other factors, like the widespread use of mobile devices among all ages, and the sociatal acceptance and allowance of rudeness (look at people on their cell phones. If chatting loudly away in a library isn't proof of a kind of imbedded insensitivity, I don't know what is.) just to name two. If they ARE confronted for their behavior, you can expect they will respond like the immature child they act like elsewhere. Mature, grown adults don't act that way (unless they're really mad. :lol: But even then, most sensible adults will take a deep breath and read over their comments before they send it off. And mature adults take responsibility for their behavior when they do screw up, without resorting to petty excuses.)
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:iconthalia-is-crazy:
thalia-is-crazy Featured By Owner Oct 12, 2010  Professional Filmographer
Oh no, I'd hate to discredit the people on the internet...
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:iconsilverstar24:
Silverstar24 Featured By Owner Oct 12, 2010  Hobbyist Photographer
I think it's a lot easier for some people to say exactly what they like over the net, be it truth or lies. A lot of people do lie over the internet because their true identity is so difficult to find.

Yes some people have respect for others but it is important to remember that some people don't.

Personally I couldn't give a damn because whatever I say over the net, I'd say in real life as well. My opinions don't change just because I'm behind a screen.
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:iconsachi-pon:
Sachi-pon Featured By Owner Oct 12, 2010  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
great article!! my parents or art least my mom i guess, think that everyone on the internet is fake o__O all my teenage girl internet friends are actually 40-year-old men who want to do inappropriate things with me!! XD
anyway i take ppl on the internet very seriously, because i think of them as real people!! these are real people expressing their real opinions. also the friendships made here are real friends. so i am like you, i don't just go 'it's just the internet."
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:iconsilverstar24:
Silverstar24 Featured By Owner Oct 11, 2010  Hobbyist Photographer
I met my boyfriend on the internet but it was only after meeting him and getting to know him face to face that we began a relationship. Before we met, yes I liked him but I don't believe it can really grow that much just by typing. There has to be a physical attraction and chemisty, which can only be experience through face to face communication.
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:iconmakazo:
Makazo Featured By Owner Oct 8, 2010
okay well here's humble opinion:

I believe that when the internet first came out, people with intelligence and integrity saw it as a way for people to communicate, a potentially endless fountain of knowledge and wisdom from different people around the world, a bringing together of cultures and ideas that would reshape the world.

They failed to see that people are, for the lack of a better term, fuckwads.

How quickly did the internet go from being that resource to becoming the single greatest destination for pornography of every deviant act ever imagined? don't get me wrong, i like porn, but even i'm astounded by the sheer amount of porn available with only the click of a mouse.
How quickly did the hackers get their hands on the internet and twist it to steal a person's identity, hijack our computers for advertising purposes, or just to implant a virus that makes our lives a living hell? These soulless, antisocial fuckwads that delight in screwing with people soon made it nearly impossible to search the internet without having expensive antivirus software (which doesn't always work).

The people who believe that the internet is a tool are no longer part of the general communities that your article talks about. They have been forced to limit their internet usage to a few trusted sites, their e-mail account and little else. I spent years away from the internet because of the fuckwads in chat rooms, forums and anywhere else they can input their stupidity.

And so the internet, the greatest invention in the last five hundred years (i would say all time, but indoor plumbing, electricity and jagermeister are my top 3) has been reduced to a plaything, an open forum for the fuckwads to say whatever crosses their minds, no matter how inaccurate, inane or intolerant it may be.

And in the last few years, the internet has spawned the epitome of the electronic antichrist, the 'social network'. Now we're being given the idea that anyone else on the face of the planet gives a crap about what's going on in our lives. How many people subscribe to twitter to find minute by minute updates about where people go, what they eat and what their BM's look like? In the 'real world' people don't care whether or not you're having a good day, with the possible exception of a few good friends and close family members.

So we've become a 'culture' of narcissistic, immature and impolite teenagers with a toy too big and too important for us to understand what we're doing. The only reason why behave the way they do is because they aren't within smacking distance of the people they talk about.

Agree or disagree, talk amongst yourselves.
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:iconsachi-pon:
Sachi-pon Featured By Owner Oct 12, 2010  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
oh my goodness. you act like almost everyone who uses the internet is just a jerk, and you called social networks the electronic antichrist??!!! really?? wow, there are actually a lot of nice people on the internet, and intelligent ones. and, i have met new friends and had lots of fun on social networks, and yes, we DO care about the events of our friends' lives, on fb and twitter. and by the way that's not all you can do on these social networks- you can share pics, news articles, games, etc. so there are a lot of good things you're overlooking.
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:iconfionacreates:
FionaCreates Featured By Owner Oct 11, 2010  Professional General Artist
Some of the first photographs taken with a camera were also pornographic. That still doesn't discredit the camera as an innovation and amazing tool for art, documentation and other such things. Pornography allowed the VHS to flourish and then the DVD. It's the first industry to jump on new technologies and distributions and no matter how people might want to close their eyes and cover their ears it's the driving force of many new technologies.

Just an ammusing fact lol. Pornography is base human fuckwadness (to use your term). As technology becomes easier to use the more banal and 'normal' it's usage becomes. 5 years ago none of my friends used the internet, now everyone uses facebook and the internet to social network all the time. We've always been a culture of narcisistic teenagers, the internet just allows this more room to be on public display. The internet is just another slice of human nature, including our need to go "I don't care, it's just the internet, la la laaa"
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:iconmaplekey:
maplekey Featured By Owner Oct 8, 2010
that was really interesting to read and well put. kudos!! ◡
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:iconmakazo:
Makazo Featured By Owner Oct 9, 2010
thanks. i could go on more, but i think i made my point.
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:icontofubeast:
Tofubeast Featured By Owner Oct 8, 2010
Another take on the issue, put into better words then I ever could come up with, just for thought. [link]
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:icontetralogia:
tetralogia Featured By Owner Oct 8, 2010
I was going to read this the day it came out, but I got waylaid by midterms!

I probably have nothing to contribute here, but I will say I really like the point you brought up about our cultural discomfort with new social media. It's like...us generation X/millennials are guinea pigs in this big social experiment. I never thought about it that way. This makes me immensely interested in how things will develop in the future. I mean, I look at my younger half-siblings with a great deal of interest in this respect because six-year old Sophia watches Youtube after school every day. I'm quite a few years younger than you and I can't even imagine doing that at six. I imagine that their total immersion in internet culture from the womb makes them somewhat more comfortable with legitimizing the internet, but at the same time, they might be so immersed in the vitriol that is online culture that they don't have any other moral reference point. I think my principles and sensibilities developed independently of the internet, because during those formative years the internet was not yet a large part of my life. What happens when what young children see from the get-go is, well, this? The tenets upon which present internet culture operates, however problematic, will be the norm for them. Will they even be able to identify the problem that you've outlined here?

You're right, though. As we move forward, this is about striking a balance between unfettered communication and mutual respect.
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:iconbadlittlemonster:
BadLittleMonster Featured By Owner Oct 8, 2010
Is saying "it's just a game" a way of going "I don't care" in hateful, childlike defiance?
I don't think it is. Though one could argue that the "internet" isn't a game, I'd say the idea is a bit similar.
When I'm playing an online game with someone, our team loses, and they have an absolute hissy fit I calmly go "It's just a game, it's supposed to be fun."

Couldn't that apply to the internet? Shouldn't you be enjoying yourself instead of getting upset over trivial things? That's how I view "it's just the internet." I see it as a way of going "don't get bent out of shape over nothing."
I don't see it as a way of belittling peers, or flaunting that you "don't care."
And even if you DIDN'T honestly care, is that SO terrible?
So someone trolled your thread, or spammed your deviant art page. Is it really appropriate, online or off, to have a huge heaving fit over it?
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:iconheysawbones:
heysawbones Featured By Owner Oct 8, 2010  Professional General Artist
Is saying "it's just a game" a way of going "I don't care" in hateful, childlike defiance?
Not always, but yes, sometimes!

Couldn't that apply to the internet? Shouldn't you be enjoying yourself instead of getting upset over trivial things? That's how I view "it's just the internet." I see it as a way of going "don't get bent out of shape over nothing."

Why should I be 'enjoying myself'? Is 'enjoying yourself' something innate to the definition of 'the internet'? I don't think it is. Furthermore, I don't think it was implied anywhere in what I wrote that people should be getting upset over 'trivial things'. That's your inference, not what I wrote. "It's just the internet" IS a way of saying "don't get bent out of shape over nothing"; the problem is, the majority of the time, when people use the phrase - they're taking perfectly legitimate concerns and implying that they are 'getting bent out of shape over nothing'.

And even if you DIDN'T honestly care, is that SO terrible?
So someone trolled your thread, or spammed your deviant art page. Is it really appropriate, online or off, to have a huge heaving fit over it?

This isn't so much about justifying people who freak out over what happens online, though I do have some empathy for them (depending on what it is they are freaking out over). I understand someone freaking out over having an ED article written about them, or over being hacked, or over being harassed by a faceless group of people who seem to have appeared unprovoked. That isn't even to say that they had no hand in what happened to them - merely that I understand being upset about it.

This is more about taking personal responsibility and not being the one to instigate these issues. Don't go trolling people's pages, don't write ED articles about people. Don't be a dick online just because you think you can get away with it. People's feelings aren't for sport, you know? Besides, in this day and age, what we say and do online is FAR more likely to affect our offline relationships (with friends, coworkers, family members, and employers) than it was five years ago.
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:icongryphelyse:
GryphElyse Featured By Owner Oct 7, 2010  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I do like this article and agree with your message - however, you could word some points a bit differently. Specifically, the examples like "It's like a child yelling I DON'T CARE". This being the Internet (:B), the one thing you don't want to insinuate is that someone is immature or childish - it is one of the easiest ways to provoke someone to lash out if they feel you're being condescending or attacking them. I understood that this wasn't your intention, but imagine how that line would look on a forum in the middle of a flamewar. It would just fan the flames.

Interesting tidbit: I do take the Internet as seriously as I take real life. That's why I do my best to stay civil to everyone, friends and strangers alike. I stay the heck out of flamewars, and it literally makes me sick to my stomach when I see people insensitively flaming and insulting each other like sometimes happens on here. There are real people behind those posts, and people sometimes seem to forget that.

By the way, have you heard of the Greater Internet F**kwad Theory? [link]
Also known (more civilly) as the Online Disinhibition Effect: [link]
It's pretty similar to what you're talking about.
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:iconheysawbones:
heysawbones Featured By Owner Oct 7, 2010  Professional General Artist
I'm very aware of Greater Internet Fuckwad Theory. Had a LJ icon of it years ago, actually.

I do understand what you are saying about implying that people are childish. However, I was hoping the fact that the article is not directed at a specific human being would permit me to be honest about my feelings regarding that behavior. I think it is childish behavior. If someone finds that insinuation offensive, I'm not sure what I can do about that, you know? I am a straightforward person. I believe that is respectful. If someone thinks I'm being condescending to them or attacking them, I'd hope it was because we'd had some sort of confrontation, or at least spoken to each other.

I'd be very willing to talk to anybody who found the insinuation personally offensive.
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:iconboltfraction:
BoltFraction Featured By Owner Oct 7, 2010  Hobbyist Digital Artist
The internet must be taken by some measure of seriousness by everyone. Otherwise, we'd all just be stuck on one bare-bones forum (since no one was serious or dedicated enough to create a more interesting or engaging site) endlessly trolling eachother in a constant, incoherent e-ternal loop, because heaven forbid anyone actually start pseudo-intellegent conversation.
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:icondotsandstripes:
DotsandStripes Featured By Owner Oct 7, 2010
it's just the internet.
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:iconmoon-lit-words:
moon-lit-words Featured By Owner Oct 7, 2010
started reading the conversation thread initiated by user solalia, but my chosen settings make following all the remarks and their respective replies annoying. point: the opposition allowed you communication outside the essay to elaborate upon the piece, or your intentions, or whatever

i'm confused, however. forgive my not reading the entire written piece, short as it is - nothing much grasped me (save, perhaps, you're quite skilled with written syntax, for which i offer my appreciation). set aside the *general* decade of your 'net experience: what prompted you to write about the 'net and a facet of its complications as a medium, the responsibility of our approach to the use of this medium, on the 'net? at a site such as dA?
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:iconheysawbones:
heysawbones Featured By Owner Oct 7, 2010  Professional General Artist
It's a good question. I'm not entirely sure if this is the right audience for the concept. Why dA?

I used to write similar things on Gaia. Why Gaia? I think I like the idea that there are other people out there on these massive social networking hubs who are interested in heavier topics. I can't be the only one. A lot of what people write to dA (as an audience) is aiming pretty low, so to speak.

I can't speak for everyone else, but when someone writes something thoughtful on dA and directs it at me, I feel a little better about things in general. It's nice to see someone being thoughtful. I can't say without bias that this piece is 'thoughtful', but that was the goal.
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:iconmoon-lit-words:
moon-lit-words Featured By Owner Oct 7, 2010
no demeaning intentions in my understanding, mind, but you're lightly saying you wrote this in an effort to make the readers feel better?

(of course there are 'heavier' thinkers. the 'net, technically not a where, but i'm not sure how else to consider it, doesn't mean by its existence those thinkers avoid being here =p)

i guess... the piece somewhat comes off to me in the following manner: temperature and windchill and all factors, there's a magnificent snowfall expected to last three days and it's minus thirty F outside. you're at the counter - wherever you wish to work in this situation - and through the door walks the female whose teeth show signs of her abuse of tobacco and likely other substances. the ineptitude of her very existence prevents her from returning the 'hello' you issue, being that she is a customer and such is your job responsibility, while she storms the counter demanding more cancer sticks. the glaze in her eyes momentarily lifts, releasing her from the stupor of her sad life, and she comments 'man, it's cold out there'

well no shit, woman. what else is obvious?

'feeling better' if i'm reading your reply correctly is a grand intent. just... you're right =p the dA audience is likely terribly lacking in the will to otherwise change

~ you wrote a good piece =) thanks for sharing
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:iconheysawbones:
heysawbones Featured By Owner Oct 7, 2010  Professional General Artist
I guess in a way it's about feeling better, yeah. I wanted to share an optimistic thought, even though I knew it could fall largely on deaf ears. The more people write something thoughtful, the closer it gets to common, right? Not to say that it would ever happen - but I think it is worth trying. If nothing else, at least a few people got something out of reading it, and I got something out of reading people's thoughts on it.

Thank you so much for commenting. It made me think.
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:iconmoon-lit-words:
moon-lit-words Featured By Owner Oct 8, 2010
randomly, before i bore you much more ;) i want to apologize for the way my last reply read. i went out jogging almost immediately after writing to you, and to a friend's for the night from there (hence the delay in my getting this out), and thought on it; it may have come off that my words seemed to attack you, when i meant only (though fully lamely put together) that i mostly agree with you

so. i am sorry if what i said read as innapropriate. if any of the rest of you in person is as this piece, you are an amazingly lovely person =)
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:icongwendolyn12:
Gwendolyn12 Featured By Owner Oct 7, 2010  Professional Traditional Artist
Thank you so much for this:worship:
Everyone should read it. It's a fantastic article. I agree with everything you stated there.
:+favlove:
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:iconrinnian:
Rinnian Featured By Owner Oct 7, 2010  Student General Artist
My favorite is when people start a fight with you, then proceed to whine, "It's only the internet! Why are you taking it so seriously? Get a life!"

Especially, this is used in defense of grammar. "It's just the internet, no one cares about grammar."
I can't respond because I have so many thoughts in my head, but they are all blown away by the stupidity of that statement. If it were 'just the internet,' sites like Google would use unintelligent chatspeak and acronyms no one knows. It would be like a dictionary misspelling everything. You couldn't look up what a word means because it's misspelled and if you don't already know what it means or how to spell it, you never will.

Denial in its most hypocritical form...
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:iconsachi-pon:
Sachi-pon Featured By Owner Oct 12, 2010  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
that is not a stupid statement. the thing is, grammar should matter on the internet, yes... in SOME places, that is. on google as you mentioned, it's not appropriate. but what about something like this? my deviantart comment? i usually dont use proper grammar and why should i? i'm not on google, i'm not typing some news article or encyclopedia entry. i'm just making a simple comment, grammar doesn't matter unless the grammar or spelling is REALLY bad and hard to read. but usually i don't care what type of grammar people use as long as i can read it easily. so you can't say that grammar always matters on the internet. it depends on the place!
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:iconrinnian:
Rinnian Featured By Owner Oct 12, 2010  Student General Artist
There's never a place for poor grammar. :no:
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:iconnuyorican14:
nuyorican14 Featured By Owner Oct 7, 2010  Student General Artist
dude. i just finished watching dr phil talking about cyberbullying--and he was continuing from yesterday's show.
People that are unfeeling idiots are what make the internet NOT "just the internet" in my mind and something more serious thatyou have to deal with.
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:iconguttix:
Guttix Featured By Owner Oct 7, 2010   Photographer
Too many words about something not even so important. Damn!
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:iconheysawbones:
heysawbones Featured By Owner Oct 7, 2010  Professional General Artist
You make typing sound like quite the formidable foe! I agree I should've put this away for a day, come back, and edited into something more concise, though.
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:icontalonair:
Talonair Featured By Owner Oct 7, 2010
very true, but for one point. I find that people are just as prone to riduling another in real life as they are on the internet.
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:iconheysawbones:
heysawbones Featured By Owner Oct 7, 2010  Professional General Artist
I almost agree with that! I do think the consequences are different!
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:icontalonair:
Talonair Featured By Owner Oct 7, 2010
true
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:iconobsidian-cyanide:
Obsidian-Cyanide Featured By Owner Oct 7, 2010
it's like someone summed up my life is one giant dA news article.
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:iconmommy-silver:
Mommy-Silver Featured By Owner Oct 7, 2010  Hobbyist Writer
I agree with you, and somehow I disagree as well on some points. There are unfortunately, idiots, as you've described, who ruin people's lifes on the internet. There are also, and I've met many friends who became real life friends, good people. Yet I do care about feelings. Why would I want to hurt yours, the reader, with my opinion? Bring it in a layer of sugar and be kind to one and all, that's the key. War brought nothing but death and destruction, love brought friends and hugs and all the other sugar coated fluff everyone loves ^_^ or better said: it's not always black and white.
Though I must agree; seeing people in real life and talking to them is way better than internet. It lacks so many things real life doesn't: your voice, emotion, expressions, the way you look, talk, intonation, everything. Now the reader of my comment reads and guesses my current state of mind. I'm currently hungry and somewhat happy for I have home made vanilla porridge with blueberries for desert. But perhaps you interpret my words otherwise?

you say it's our responsibility to behave on the internet and stop squealing about how immature we all are. I say your right about that. It's my responsibility, and yours. Unfortunately, just as in real life, people will hate you for that opinion. heck... someone will even hate me for my opinion.

Being honest about your feelings results in immature behaviour from other insecure people? I lost the ability to care about these insecure people. I just can't bring myself to understand them anymore. Nowadays I let 'm talk to a wall...

yet I agree on one point for sure: internet is mass communication, just check out how many people you've reached and the lively debate that's started ^^ Congrats!
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:iconheysawbones:
heysawbones Featured By Owner Oct 7, 2010  Professional General Artist
I wish I could favorite your post! I actually don't think online communication is ideal- I don't think any form of communication is. Face-to-face is probably the best for one-on-one messages, but even it has disadvantages. I feel that a lot of the problems people think are 'inherent' in the Internet as a communication medium are solvable with the liberal application of personal responsibility. Also, yes, the debate is great. Thank you for your thoughtful reply.
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:iconmariafox:
mariafox Featured By Owner Oct 7, 2010
A decade? I've been here FOR 13 YEARS, BRO.
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:icontalonair:
Talonair Featured By Owner Oct 7, 2010
Isn't that being slightly pedantic? A lot of people would say 13 years is around a decade
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:iconexillior:
Exillior Featured By Owner Oct 7, 2010  Hobbyist General Artist
I don't think I've come across that phrase very often before. I mean, no more than I've heard "it's just the phone" being used. :P I've certainly heard "It's just fiction, why are you crying over a book?" a lot, though. :lol:
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:iconkazumisangel:
kazumisangel Featured By Owner Oct 7, 2010
Exactly. :XD: My parents use that ALL the time.
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:iconexillior:
Exillior Featured By Owner Oct 8, 2010  Hobbyist General Artist
:highfive:
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:iconkazekoh:
Kazekoh Featured By Owner Oct 7, 2010  Student General Artist
I don't take people seriously on the internet unless they are my friends. Most of the people being idiots would never say it to anyone's face. I ignore them frankly, or in the very least get into smart ass mode. I never say anything now that I wouldn't say in real life to someone though. If someone is a jerk, I tell them; real life or not.
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:icontriple-q:
Triple-Q Featured By Owner Oct 7, 2010  Hobbyist Digital Artist
[link]
deviantART muro drawingComment Drawing
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:iconckrzysz09:
ckrzysz09 Featured By Owner Oct 7, 2010
Yeah I know it's just the Internet. I only like it or I only surf for some information, to see arts in here, to download music, to play games but I don't like chatting except for my fellow artists and gamers talking random stuffs but never my real life situations LOL.
I'm a computer student so I really need Internet and I never been in love by just chatting :'D

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